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Relief package scandal rocks IDP camps

Questions are trailing the disbursement of the World Bank’s Target Grant Transfer funds to Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) in Bauchi, Gombe and Adamawa states. While beneficiaries were to receive N200,000 over a period of time, the IDPs alleged that they have only received between N30,000 and N50, 000 since 2017 and all their  efforts to get the balance have failed, INNOCENT DURU reports.

  • Officials halt disbursement of N.2m World Bank money promised each household after paying N30,000
  • Hunger, Ill-health spike death toll in camps
  • Survivors recall how insurgents murdered loved ones

Zara Umoru, a mother of eight had her husband brutally murdered in 2014 by Boko Haram members in Borno State. Zara, together with her eight children subsequently fled her home town in Gwoza Local Government Area and that began a journey of the widow into a world of misery and uncertainty.

“When we ran away from Gwoza, my children and I started moving from place to place begging people to help them wash their clothes in order to get money to survive. Sometimes, if I washed clothes with my children, we could get between N500 and N600 daily. At times, some neighbours would give my children the remnant of what they have eaten in their houses,” she said.

After some time of wandering about, Zara and her children moved to Bauchi State to search for better living conditions and also stave off the challenges posed by insurgents.

Her frustration started to ease when the Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) in the state were asked to register for Target Grant Transfer (TGT), a World Bank funds that would see them getting a total of N200,000 over a period of time.

After receiving the initial N30,000 and an ATM card that she would use for subsequent withdrawals, Zara  has not heard from the officials nor received any other payment. This, she said, has dashed her hope of starting a business that would put an end to her woes.

Zara said: “I benefitted from the World Bank money. I was given an ATM card and also got N30,000. When they came at the beginning in 2017, they said they were going to give us N200,000 broken down to N20,000, N30,000, N50,000 and N100,000.  But we have not set our eyes on them since they gave us the initial N30,000. I don t know their office and don’t even know how to communicate with them.”

Zara, who is the IDPs woman-leader in Bauchi State, is deeply worried about her future and that of her eight children. “The man who gave us a room apartment we are occupying is now late. It is this one room that my eight children and I are living in.

“We still engage in helping people to wash clothes to have money to feed. I have become a washer woman here in Bauchi.

“Like I said earlier, at times, some neighbours who see our plight do give my children the remnant of what they have eaten in their houses.

“Boko Haram put me in all this. They killed my husband and left me with eight children. My husband was running away to where he could seek refuge on a mountain when Boko Haram insurgents caught and murdered him.”

IDPs’ chairman in the state, (Bauchi) Buba Musa Shehu, who also hails from  Gwoza Local Government Area in Borno State, confirmed Zara’s claim that the balance of the World Bank funds had not been paid to them.

He said: “I benefitted from the TGT programme of the World Bank. They promised to give us N200,000 but they have only given us N30,000   since 2017. They have not given us the balance since then. “We have written petitions and have been struggling to make them pay the balance to no avail.”

The story is not different in Gombe and Adamawa states where the IDPs feel they are being ripped off. A frontline member of the group in Akko Local Government Area, Gombe State, Bukar Alirambe, was furious as he shared the frustration the group has experienced asking for their balance.

“We registered for the World Bank fund meant to give each registered household a total sum of N200,000. In 2018, they gave us an ATM card promising that they would give N200,000 to each registered household for capital project and emergency relief.

“About 3,534 households benefitted from the initial N30,000 they paid for our emergency relief. Some of us also got N20,000 for relocating from Borno. Those who did not relocate from any state were not given the N20,000.

“In all, we are entitled to N150,000 balance which, according to them, is for capital project. They have not given it to us till date.

“They said there is a second phase of the programme but the IDPs on the second batch have not benefitted at all from the funds.

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Rwandan refugees

“We have gone to the extent of writing and submitting petition to Senator Ali Ndume, the senator representing Southern Borno but nothing has come out of it. The petition was submitted in 2019.

“We are calling on the government to come to our aid by helping us to get this money so that we can start some petty businesses.

“We are begging the Federal Ministry of Finance and everybody that is involved in this programme to come to our aid so that we can be self-reliant and able to send our children to school.”

The IDPs chairman in Adamawa State, Usman Yahaya, corroborated the allegation, adding that what was promised them in Adamawa was N400,000.

He said: “The former coordinator told us they were going to give us N400,000 but not at a go. They said they were going to give us N30,000 for the first payment, then N20,000, N50,000, N100,000 and N200,000 respectively.

“They gave us N30,000 and later changed the coordinator. The new coordinator said there is nothing like that, saying the N30,000 we had received was the only money meant for us.

“Yet they gave us ATM cards that will expire in 2022.”

IDPs decry neglect by federal agencies

Aside their frustrations accessing the balance of the alleged World Bank funds, the IDPs are aggrieved by the attitude of Federal Government owned humanitarian agencies to their plight.

“Government agencies don’t care about us. There are more than 30,000 IDPs within the four local governments here in Yola.

“They announce in the media that they are taking care of us, but in reality, that is not true,” Adamawa State IDPs chairman, Yahaya said.

He alleged that the government agencies take care of only the IDPs that live in the camps, leaving out those that reside elsewhere. Their complaints and agitations, he said, have yielded no fruits.

He said: “We are not in the camp because it cannot accommodate all of us. Those that live in the camps are not up to one quarter of those of us that live the hosts in the communities.

“We have three official camps in Adamawa State. Last month, our secretary, woman leader and I went to NEMA to tell them about our plight.

“They said it was a directive given to them but that they only serve only those in camps and not those that live outside.

“They said we should go to camp. But if we go, they will not be able to accommodate us.”

Yahaya alleged that despite the huge budgetary allocations to the humanitarian agencies, they have not been getting any support. “There is nothing free at all for us. We pay for rent and our children’s education.

“It was one NGO (NRC) that supported us with N25,000 each for accommodation two years ago.

“There are many of our people that are homeless. Many are living in dilapidated houses. Some are in uncompleted houses.

“They stay in any kind of house, provided there is a roof on it, and they pay rent for such buildings.

“The government is not coming to our aid at all.”

Hunger, lack of access to healthcare spike death toll among IDPs

Following the challenges posed by acute hunger and lack of access to healthcare, checks showed that death rate among the IDPs has been on the increase.

In Gombe, more than 40 people are said to have died recently.

“Many of our people, including children, are dying of hunger and attendant health challenges.

“Some of the children don’t have food to eat for two to three days.  Between 2019 and now, about 40 people, including children, have died,” Bukar Alirambe said.

“We don’t have a primary health centre close to us.

“Between 2018 and 2019, Victim Support Group gave money to the specialist and teaching hospitals here in Gombe to support our treatment.

“The funds have been exhausted. Unfortunately, they didn’t provide fresh funds to continue this laudable cause.

“We have resorted to self-help. Another opportunity we have now is from the Catholic Relief Funds. They give anti-malaria drugs to our people.

“In the last six to seven months, the pregnant women among us have not been getting medical support.

“They have only been getting anti-malaria medications from CRF.”

The IDPs chairman in Bauchi State, Buba Musa Shehu, also bemoaned the rising death toll among his people.

He said: “Many of our people are dying. This year alone, we have lost about 50 people.

“Just last week, we had a high casualty figure. There is no access to good medical care.

“There is no support from any organization apart from the North East Development Commission who sometimes help us with foodstuffs.

IDPs in Katsina

Hajia Sadiya Umar Farouq

“The IDPs in Bauchi State are about 54,000. When we arrived here, many of our people were begging on the streets to get money to eat.

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“We don’t have a hospital. Whenever any of us is sick, we would have to contribute money among ourselves to treat the person.

“When one of our women wanted to give birth recently, we had to contribute money to take her to Maiduguri for treatment.”

In Adamawa State, the IDPs chairman said no fewer than 50 members had died recently.

‘Everyday was war in Borno’

Six years or more after they narrowly escaped the swords of the dreaded Boko Haram sect, the IDPs are yet to overcome the terror they experienced back at home in Borno State.

Reliving his close shave with death at the hands of the insurgents, the IDPs chairman in Bauchi,  Buba Musa Shehu, said: “I fled  Borno in 2014 because of Boko Haram.

“They came to our local government area around 5pm on August 5, 2014, killing people, including my family members. I lost my sisters, brothers, uncles and so on.

“I left my family in Gwoza in the night, ran away through Cameroon and came back through Yola to Bauchi.

“I trekked barefoot for eight days without food. I only survived on the water I found on the way.”

Asked how life is in Bauchi, Shehu said: “We are suffering a great deal here. First of all, we are living in our hosts’ communities and not in a camp. We are paying rent.

“I have four wives and 34 children. Not all my children are going to school. About 18 of them are not going to school because of financial challenges.

“I do odd jobs to raise money to pay for rent and feed my family. I assist at times at the block-making place. At times I go to bush to fetch firewood to sell. We don’t have any empowerment.

“What we need now is school for our children to get education. We also need empowerment so that we can go and farm.

“We don’t have farm implements, so we are always idling away. At times, we contribute money among ourselves to pay rent for a member.

“About 80 per cent of our children are out of school.

“Home is better than anywhere else. Wherever you go outside your home, you will feel isolated.

But the insurgents are still there in Borno. The area is not safe.

“In my house right now, there are five orphans who have no relations whatsoever to call their own or run to.”

His Adamawa counterpart, Yahaya, who hails from Gwoza, said:  I fled Borno in 2014.  I have a farm at Madagali in Adamawa State.

“I was returning to Borno one day when they called to inform me that Gwoza was under fire and that people were already fleeing. “I had always believed that the Nigerian army team at Gwoza then was very strong and that they would not capture the area easily.

“It was the third day that my family surfaced.  We stayed at Madagali hoping that the area would be safe. But to our surprise, the insurgents struck within a week of our stay there.

“We ran from there to Mubi while those who were well to do moved to Yola.

“After some time, the insurgents entered Michika, forcing those that were there to run down to our place in Mubi.

“We stayed Mubi for about a year before the insurgents attacked the area and forced us to run to Yola.”

The terrorist group, Yahaya said, killed so many of his neighbours.

“The number is uncountable,” he said.

One of the displaced persons in Gombe, Mohammed Abdulahi, also spoke about how he escaped from Borno in October 2014.

He said: “I ran here in Gombe before my family came to join me. I just had to run when Boko Haram members came to our place. They were not attacking women as such.

“As a male, you had to climb the hill to escape. From Gwoza, I trekked to a village near Adamawa. There, some organisations assisted by giving us money to transport ourselves.

“Many of my relations were killed by Bojko Haram. Many things are happening there now. A lot of people are being killed.

“Boko Haram is occupying all our villages in Borno up till now. We weren’t sleeping back then in Borno State.

“There was also no rest during the day. You will always hear sounds of bombs in nearby villages. Gunshots were always reverberating every day, and each time the children heard the sound, they would run inside.

Mohammed lamented that the host communities deliberately jerked up rent when because of the high number of IDPs.

“My uncle that I was staying with initially rented an apartment for me. He pays N40,000 annually. “The hosts increased the rent because many of our people were coming here. Gombe is the centre of the North East.

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“Many IDPs from Adamawa, Borno and Yobe are coming here and that is why they increased the rent.

“We have very little to eat. We eat once or at most twice a day.

“We used to go to the hospital. Formerly, we were receiving free treatment when there was victims support fund. Now, there is no such opportunity.

I have five children. Three are in school but two are out of school because of financial challenges.

“I feel very sad about it. If I have the means, I will train them up to university level. But as things stand, that is not possible.”

Also sharing her experience, a widow, Hadiza Alli, from Gwoza Local Government, said: “I have left Borno since August, 2014. My husband fell ill and died, leaving me with three children and an aged woman to cater for. “When the Boko Haram insurgents came attacking our area, I took my children into a cave one night and hid them there.

“From there, I managed to run away with them to Mubi. It was at Mubi that I got help to come to Gombe.

“I sell akara to earn a living and also feed my family.

“I am living in a rented apartment paid for by my elder sister who is resident in Maiduguri.

“She died two months ago.  I don’t know how I will pay the next rent.

“Only one of my three children is in school. I don’t feel happy that my kids are not in school.

“They have been selling sachet water by the roadside since they can’t go to school.

“If the situation in Borno improves today, I will go back immediately. Unfortunately for us, the problem is not abating.

World Bank fund project managers, NCFRI speak

An official of the World Bank Target Grant Transfer fund project, who identified himself simply as Atiku, declined comment on the allegations levelled by the IDPs on the grounds that he was not competent to speak on the matter.

“May I ask who gave you my phone number?” he asked after laughing and expressing surprise about the IDPs claim.

“I am a journalist who can get any contact I want,” the reporter responded.

Atiku then retorted: “I also have the right to ask how you got my number so that I can channel you to the person who has the competence to respond to your request. I am not the national coordinator. I am just the head of the M and E of the project.  You have every right to… we also encourage disclosure.  I cannot give you any information without the instruction of my national coordinator.

“That was why I was asking if the person that gave you my number knew the right person to handle this. He would have channeled you to the national coordinator who has the competence to give the information. I don’t have it.

“I put up report, I collect report, I collate report but I don’t have the right to give out any information.  That is what I am trying to tell you.

“The right person to respond to your interview is the national coordinator.”

The National Coordinator of the project, Hajara Sami, did not answer the calls made to her mobile telephone.

She, however, responded tersely to a text message sent by the reporter, saying: “Ok. Wl (will) call when I’m out of noisy environment.”

She was, however, yet to call at the time of filing this report.

Also contacted to clear the air on the IDPs’ allegation of neglect and being short-changed by government agencies, the spokesman of National Commission for Refugees, Migrants and IDPs (NCFRMI), Abdul Onu, said:“I am actually not in town now. But there is an SA (Special Assistant) Media to the commissioner now. I will introduce you to him so that you can take it up from there.”

He was also yet to send the contact at the time of filing this report.

Cullled from The Nation Newspaper  (Nigeria)

 

 

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Investigation

How Nigeria ‘imports, spreads’ COVID-19

REVEALED: Deportees from Austria, others rejoin Nigerian families without COVID-19 tests

The prospect of an explosion in COVID-19 cases is staring the nation in the face following the failure of the minders of the airports to subject immigrants from high risk countries to the protocols spelt out by the Presidential Task Force (PTF), merely accepting the results of tests deportees claim to have done in the countries they are coming from, INNOCENT DURU reports.

  • Returnees admit not observing protocols before reuniting with kinsmen
  • NCDC, Immigration mum after requesting questions
  • Port Health spokesman, others decline comments

A Nigerian deported from Austria has said that he and his other compatriots deported from the European country were admitted into the country without undergoing any test upon his arrival at the Murtala Mohammed International Airport in Lagos on November 12.

Identifying himself simply as Breeze, the Austria returnee said: “We did not do any COVID-19 test when we arrived in Nigeria. The test I did was in Austria. When I was coming, the police over there gave me the result and asked me to give it to the Nigerian Immigration Service officials when I get here.”

Expressing surprise at the way he and other returnees from different countries were dismissed at the airport without any tests in spite of the havoc the virus was still wreaking across the world, he said he could not stop wondering how the country had managed to survive the ravaging pandemic with the care free attitude of the minders of our entry ports.

“If any of us (deportees) had been infected, he would have gone ahead to infect the relations he was going to meet at home,” Breeze noted.

“I did COVID-19 test three times in Austria. The first was before I had issues with the authorities. The second was in my place of work and the third was when I was in prison. All the results came out negative.

“We weren’t going out during the COVID-19 period. We always wore masks and used hand sanitizers from time to time.”

He noted that rather than make the deportees undergo the COVID-19 protocols at the Murtala Mohammed Airport, “the Nigerian Immigration officials started threatening to seize the passports of some of my deported colleagues because they had fingerprints in Italy and Spain.  They said they wanted to send the passports to Abuja and that they would suffer before they would be able to get it back.

“The affected deportees had to start begging the officials, telling them that they had no money to give them because they had been in prison for two to three years.

“Some of us came back only with the clothes we wore. The place oozed with odour because we were not having our bath every day while we were in prison. In the prison where I served, we bathed two times a week.

“But the immigration officials were telling the guys to give them the money, wristwatches or gold they came back with. Fearing that they could lose their passports, some of the returnees gave them gold worth N200,000 before their passports were given back to them.

“After everything, they brought a bus, asked us to go into it and dropped us outside the airport,” he said.

According to a release by the Presidential Task Force on COVID-19 on September 4, 2020, titled ‘provisional quarantine protocol for travellers arriving Nigeria from any country’, “all travellers arriving in Nigeria must have tested NEGATIVE for COVID-19 by PCR in country of departure pre-boarding. The PCR test MUST be within 96 hours before departure and preferably within 72 hours pre-boarding.

“All intending passengers are required to register via an online national payment portal (Nigeria International Travel Portal –http://nitp.ncdc.gov.ng) and pay for a repeat (second) PCR test to be done upon arrival in Nigeria.”

Another deportee who arrived with the group that was brought back on December 10, 2020 confirmed that 43 of them who arrived on that day did not do any COVID-19 test.

He said the authorities only checked their temperature after which they were bundled out of the airport.

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“We didn’t do any COVID-19 test here in Nigeria because we already did in Germany before coming to Nigeria. They only checked our temperature and that was all. The man holding the machine only placed it on our foreheads and that was all. I don’t know if that is how they carry out the COVID-19 test here because it has been long I left the country.

“I did COVID-19 test before I was deported. I did the test on December 7, 2020. On December 9, the police came and bundled me out of my house saying that I must go back to my country. I, together with 42 others landed on December 10.”

The embattled deportee expressed surprise about his deportation, saying that he had earlier applied to voluntarily return home and was made to undergo all the necessary training.

He said: “I registered to come back voluntarily but I was deported. I applied to return home in September. I went for the training, coaching and seminars that were organised for people who volunteered to return.

“After completing the training, I was waiting for them to contact me to ask me when I was going to do my booking. Actually, I was supposed to return in January or February, 2021, but before I knew it, they deported me.

“They didn’t give me a dime. Had it been they gave me the money and everything they promised to give me, I will not be calling it a deportation. I didn’t get a dime out of what they promised.

“I should be getting some things from IOM and some others. I even have a paper the woman from ZRB put down for me; how much to get and how to get it. She showed me all the benefits that are for people on voluntary returns but they ended up deporting me without giving me any compensation.”

Prior to recent deportation of Nigerians in Germany, Rex Osa, the Co-ordination Activist for Network Refugees 4Refugees, a political platform for refugees/migrant self-organisation based in Stuttgart, Germany, had raised the alarm that Germany was about exporting Coronavirus to Nigeria.

Osa said: “Germany has scheduled a charter deportation operation to Nigeria for December 10th, the same day Nigerians in Germany will be protesting against police brutality in Nigeria and Germany’s complicity in the destabilization of Africa.

“The fact that Germany will continue with deportation enforcement amidst the Coronavirus pandemic and its position as corona (Coronavirus) hotspot expresses Germany´s determination to export corona to Nigeria and aid further destabilization of the African continent at large.

“Reflecting on the situation of the scandalous corona outbreak in German refugee camps like Ellwangen in Baden Württemberg, asylum seekers were locked up and not allowed to leave the camp for many weeks.

“Even those who had tested negative to Covid-19 were neither separated nor allowed to leave the camp. It was all about protecting Germans.”

Osa added: “During the peak of the corona pandemic in March, Germany and its allies were quick to place a travelling ban on flights from Africa as they envisaged a serious corona impact in the African continent. Unfortunately, the reverse has been the case.

“With Germany being corona hotspot at the moment, the Nigerian people cannot be protected like Germans hence a negative corona test is sufficient to enforce deportation to Nigeria. Asylum seekers were being ordered by district Alein authorities to undertake corona test in preparation for deportation.

“Going by this development, the German government is actively engaging in exporting corona to further aid destabilisation in Nigeria and the African continent at large. Such act of the Angela Merkel-led government is an obvious show of contempt, lack of solidarity and no regrets for its colonial atrocities against the African people, because as far as the German government is concerned, the lives of Africans do not deserve to be protected.

“We are by the report calling on asylum seekers, migrant community, migrant solidarity activist and networks to mobilise their friends around Berlin to join our protest at the Nigerian Embassy and the German Chancellors Office today. Our Protest against police brutality in Nigeria symbolises denouncement of all forms of police violence in Germany and everywhere.

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How we were deported from Austria, others

Recalling his experience coming back to the country, Breeze said: “We arrived in Nigeria on Thursday, November 12, 2020. We left Austria in the morning for Germany. We were 22 Nigerians that left Austria that day. We picked another two Nigerians from Germany before coming to Nigeria. We were escorted by 120 policemen. Each one of us had two policemen attached to him.

“We had the same number of policemen attached to us when we came out of prison. When we left the prison, we didn’t know where we were going because the vehicle was dark and sealed. It was when we got to the airport that we knew their mission. Then they started taking us one after the other into the waiting plane there in Austria.

“The pilot announced that we were about to move. We arrived in Deutschland, Germany at 6: 10. The plane refueled and had the two people I spoke earlier join us from there. Then the pilot announced once again that we were about to leave.

“When we were about getting to Lagos, they started calling each of us to give us our phones and wristwatches. Many of the people in the flight that day were sick but nobody cared about their state of health.

“Before some of us were deported, they took them to the hospital for treatment, but they still deported them even in their poor health conditions.”

Blaming the Nigerian authorities in Austria for the deportation of the citizens, he said: “The Nigerian envoys in Austria don’t speak well of us before the Austrian authorities. They speak contemptuously of our people such that the people would never consider a rethink about whatever they had planned to do. They are the ones causing all this for our people.

“The Austrian authorities are not friendly with Nigerians. The level of racism is very high.  They don’t relate with other Africans like Ghana in that manner. They treat Somalians, Malians very well but I don’t know why they treat Nigerians unfairly.”

Prison experience

Reliving his prison experience, Osa said: “The experience in the prison was so horrible. We bathed two times a week. The soap was not good and there was no good food and no television.

“There was a place they made for us to walk around for 30 minutes but the officials reduced it to 15 minutes. Some inmates had rashes on their hands because of the prison conditions. I had it too and showed it to them. People were falling sick but I am not aware of anyone dying.

“I am happy to return to my homeland. It has been long I left the country.  I am not really happy that after all those years, I came back in this manner. I was expecting that everybody including the country (Nigeria) would be happy with me on return but here I am in this manner.”

Immigration service mum after asking for questions

Nigeria Immigration Service officials in Lagos and Abuja were not forthcoming on providing information about the deportations. The service had in the past denied deportations witnessed and reported by our correspondent.

National Public Relations Officer of the service, Sunday James, was short of making denials this time around. Instead, he frowned at how he could be asked to provide information about deportation from abroad on the phone.

“How will you just call me now and expect me to tell you how many Nigerians were deported? You have to give me time. Send the questions to me on my phone please, so that I can know what you are asking.”

The questions were immediately sent to him but he was yet to respond at the time of filing this report.

Assistant Comptroller of Immigration, Lagos, Etim Edet, who was previously at the Murtala Muhammed International Airport, was evasive on the matter.

“I am not in the office to find out please. I will get back to you. I am not in the office today,” he said.

When our correspondent told him that somebody in the office could provide him with the answer, he said: “I can’t say. I don’t know how authentic the information may be. I have to verify the information.”

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Pressed further, Etim said: “I am not the PRO now. The PRO is there. I will have to find out in the office. The PRO is in a meeting right now. Thank you very much.”

Spokesperson of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Ferdinand Nwoye, did not fare better than his immigration counterpart when asked about the deportations.

“How can you ask me that kind of question?” he queried.

“Because you work with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs,” our correspondent replied.

“If I work in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs… I take inventory of all Nigerians that are deported from where and to where?

“From Germany, Austria and others”, our correspondent interjected.

“I don’t have any information on it. Ask immigration.”

Asked if the ministry is not briefed each time Nigerians are deported, Nwoye said: “Ask them (Immigration) that question. You can equally call immigration to find out from them. They are equally a government agency.

“Nigerians that are deported, depending on the country they are deported from, as soon as they arrive here, it is immigration that take inventory of all those things. So ask immigration and not me.”

Further prodded on what the ministry’s records are saying about deportation in recent times, Nwoye said: “I don’t know,” as he ended the telephone conversation, saying, “Thank you very much. I am eating.”

Nigerian envoy, FAAN provide conflicting statistics

Nigerian envoy and Head of Section at the embassy in Germany, Mr Bello Anka and spokesperson of the Federal Airways Authority of Nigeria (FAAN) Henrietta Yakubu, in different chats with The Nation provided statistics on the citizens deported in recent times, albeit with some contradictions.

While the Nigerian envoy put the number of deportees from Germany and Austria at 28, the FAAN spokesperson put the figures at 43.

Anka said: “Twenty-eight Nigerians, from our records, have been deported in the last three months. Most of them were people who came seeking for asylum.

“After one to two years of consideration, the authorities decided they were not qualified. Some of them have served their prison sentence.

“After serving two and a half years prison sentence in Germany, such a person is banned from remaining in the country.

“There are few cases like that. The deportees are not necessarily all from Germany. It is the EU that organises the deportation. They pick the people from different locations and return them to Nigeria, using a chartered flight.”

Yakubu, in a text message replying to questions sent to her, said: “A deportee flight no AWC 371 Reg G-VYGM arrived on 10-12-20 at 13:55hrs from Germany. The total is 43, 39 males and four females, via Air Tanker.

“Another deportee flight arrived today 16-12-20 from United States flight no N207AY Reg. OAE Omni Air International @06:35hrs total 30, male 28 and female two.”

She concurred that COVID-19 test is a must requirement for people coming into the country but advised that our correspondent should check with the Port Health when asked if the deportees did COVID-19 test on arrival.

“Of course, it is a requirement. You will have to ask Port Health concerning isolation; that is not FAAN’s responsibility,” he said.

When The Nation reached out to the spokesperson of Port Health, Dr Alex Morenike Okoh, she said she was not authorised to speak on the issue.

 

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Investigation

Nigerian migrants’ sojourn in Middle East ends in woes

Nigeria Immigrant

The quest for greener pastures in the Middle East countries has left many Nigerian migrants, mostly females, worse off than they were before they left the country. Many of them have been sexually assaulted, put in prison on trumped up charges and visited with cruel treatments their employers would not give to beasts. Kafala, a system that gives employers absolute powers over the migrants in parts of the region is compounded by the outbreak of the Covid-19 pandemic which made it impossible for many of them to be paid for the period they slaved for their bosses, INNOCENT DURU reports.

  • Cruel Kafala system, Covid-19 pandemic expose migrants to inhuman treatment
  • Maimed, sexually assaulted victims frustrated, commit suicide

Jummy, a graduate of Computer Science, had heaved a sigh of relief after struggling to complete her university education. “It is time to reap the fruits of my labour”, she said to herself in the hope that she would soon secure a good job.

Her dream of bidding poverty and misery farewell saw a glimmer of hope shortly after she completed the compulsory one year National Youth Service Corps (NYSC) programme.

“Immediately I completed my NYSC, I met a man who asked if I was interested in travelling to Saudi Arabia. He promised that I was not going there to work as a housemaid,” she said.

Jummy said to convince her that a white collar job awaited her in Dubai, “he told me to go with my credentials; that the moment I got there, I would see a woman that would help me secure a job.

“I invested all the money I saved during my NYSC into the travelling project. I also paid the man, but unfortunately, I no longer know his whereabouts. He has not even chatted with me once since I came here.”

Getting to Dubai full of hopes, she said: “When I met the woman here in Saudi Arabia, I gave her my credentials, telling her that I was told she would help me get a job. But to my chagrin, she said I was here to work as a housemaid.

kafala
•Some stranded ladies crowded in a room

“I started crying, telling her that I am a graduate and that I had been promised a better job.

“When I told her that I wanted to return to Nigeria, she said that would be on the condition that I paid her the money she paid to the agent, which, according to her, was more than a million naira.

“Before I travelled, they told me not to tell my family members about it because they could scuttle the plans spiritually.

“I ended up signing two-year contract as a housemaid. Throughout the two years, I didn’t go anywhere; not even outside. They made us to wear uniforms like prisoners instead of our normal clothes. I was made to work all day.

“If they see one sitting down, they will be angry. The salary they are paying is about N70,000.

“At a point, my boss started giving me problems I could not bear. She started dropping broken cups for me to wash. And when I complained about it, she said I was there as a housemaid and that I had been sold to her.

“When one of the broken cups cut my hand and blood started gushing out, she complained that my blood was smelling. I was subsequently locked up in one room where I ate and did everything.”

But she said she was not alone in her ordeal.”There are a lot of our people here that are mentally sick. If they return to Nigeria, they must first go for treatment or they will suffer mental problems,” she said.

It is also a tale of woes for Rayo, who was trafficked to Lebanon by a trusted family friend who had promised her a good job in Dubai.

She said: “I got to Lebanon on August 28, 2019. Two days after I arrived there, I was taken to the hospital to take an injection. Two days after taking the injection, my hand got swollen, causing my employer to reject me.

“I was subsequently taken back to the office of my agent who took me to another employer where I was asked to work from 6 am to 12 am. Following the heavy workload, I fainted on the third day. Thereafter, my agent took me to a place where I underwent training for a week.”

She recalled that after the training, she was taken to another house where she spent about five weeks.

She said: “In that house, there was no food for me. I was not allowed to use phone, and I was to clean the house, work as a gateman, wash the cars and baby sit, among other tasks.

“My agent got annoyed when I told her I couldn’t continue with the work, because I was looking like a skeleton and already having a lot of odour all over my body.

“She subsequently decided to take me to another house where I was to spend another one month for training, but I declined and told her I wanted  to go back home. She got angry, beat the hell out of me and refused to feed me for two days.”

READ  Gavi, IOM join forces to improve immunization coverage for migrants

The agent, Rayo said, eventually took her to another house that was another hell for her.

“There, I cleaned three rooms, three toilets, two big sitting rooms, a big compound and many more every day. The work load affected me seriously, causing me to menstruate for more than six months without stopping.

“With the help of God, Ms Omotola Fawunmi and the Oyo State Government, I returned home on July 11.”

But Rayo’s return did not necessarily spell an end to her troubles.

She said: “Life has not been what we expected it to be when we were coming home. We didn’t come back with any money so survival has been pretty difficult.

“Before I travelled, I was working as a secretary in a hotel. After completing my education, I went into teaching before meeting the owner of the hotel where I was eventually employed.

“It was along the line that I met the agent that said I should travel to Dubai. He assured that I would be paid N120,000 monthly in Dubai. The agent is a brother to my classmate in the secondary school.

“She introduced me to him and because the offer was coming through her, I was convinced that it would not be a scam. It was when I got to the airport that I realised that it was Lebanon that I was going to, and because I had invested a lot of money in the journey, I could not turn back at the airport.”

Omotola
Omotola

After all she suffered in Lebanon, Rayo said she only received salaries for five months of the 11 months she worked.

“I was paid N68,000 monthly. The few months’ salaries I received were used to pay back the money I borrowed before I travelled. They could not pay the outstanding salaries because they could not afford to.”

Another migrant who shared her ordeal with The Nation was Sola, a practising nurse who quit her nursing job in mid 2019 to seek greener pastures in Lebanon.

“I am working as a maid here (Lebanon) and have suffered a lot. But I thank God I am still alive,” she said as she recounted her ordeal in the hands of her madam.

“I have been working without getting any salary and basic care from my madam, who also beats me up each time I ask her about my salary. She hits me with anything she finds around her. She pushed me one day and I hit my chest badly against the wall and fell down the staircase.

“I wash all the rooms every day and take care of the baby without a chance to rest at all.”

Asked how she got to Lebanon, she said: “It was someone I used to treat as a nurse that facilitated my coming here. I was always telling her that I wished to have a shop to start my own business, but she said I should try and go to Lebanon and that all I would do was to take care of the house.

“Unfortunately I found myself in slavery when I got here. She asked for N250,000 but I have only paid N150,000. The last time I paid her was December last year.

“She is still asking me to send money but my parents said I should not because of the suffering I am undergoing here.

“I have run out of the house when I saw that those people could kill me one day. I ran to the embassy.”

Abbey, who recently returned from Lebanon, said the person she worked for did not pay her any salary. She said: “I went there in March this year. It was Governor Makinde that paid for us to come home. I paid N100,000 to the agent here to travel. When our bosses couldn’t pay and we were complaining, they went and dropped us by a bush.

“We were nine in number. We stayed in the bush for a week before we found our ways to the embassy. It was some of us who had money that were buying food for us.

“The Nigerian Embassy rented an apartment for us but they were not giving us food. We were collecting money from our parents back home to survive.

“I was supposed to be paid $200 a month but I didn’t get a dime as salary all through my stay. When I wanted to do COVID-19 test in Lebanon, it was an NGO called ‘This is Lebanon’ that gave me money to pay before I was allowed to return home.

A check on the nation’s migrants in Oman shows they were not faring better.

One of the returnees, Suzan, described her experience as one she does not want to remember anymore.

READ  Real reasons Nigerians are barred from jobs in Dubai

She said: “I was introduced to travelling to Oman by a man who happens to be my agent. He came with information that they needed a stylist, but at the end, he told me about a teaching job, which caught my interest.

“But the story changed afterwards. He did my passport for N25,000. The experience is a very long and sad story which I don’t wish to recollect.”

Zain Lawson, a co-founder of This is Lebanon, an international NGO assisting Africans undergoing hardship to return home, told The Nation of a Nigerian woman who was supposed to return home recently but could not because her former agent filed a complaint against her.

Lawson said: “The same agent who beat her up threatened to kill her and stole her salary. After she ran away, he reported her to the police so if she tries to fly out she’ll be arrested.

“She reported her agent to Lebanon’s Ministry of Labour but they blocked her after several messages.”

He further said: “One of the Nigerian women who was injured during the Beirut blast was thrown out on the street, went to get her wounds bandaged, went to the airport covered in bandages from her injuries, but was arrested because her employer made a complaint against her.”

Kafala system explained

Experts in the migration world have pointed out the ills of the Kafala system practised in many Middle East countries.

One of them, Omotola Fawunmi, founder of RebirthUB Africa said the system has been around for a long time and it is a predominant employment system in the Middle East.T

Fawunmi said: “A lot has been written about the system but many people sincerely do not know about the Kafala system and what it means for them. It is a system that impoverishes. It is a system that makes an economic migrant either a slave to the recruiter or the employer.

“Kafala should be abolished. It doesn’t give the migrant domestic worker options or choices. It empowers slavery, it empowers subjugation, it empowers oppression of the migrant domestic workers.”

Ground Coordinator of This is Lebanon, Nia Evans, said the Kafala employment system is state sponsored slavery and domestic workers lack the most basic of protections.

“Along with Oman, Lebanon remains the only country in the Middle East without any labour laws governing domestic workers.

“There are no laws of any kind that protect domestic workers. Lebanese employers have complete impunity to treat workers as their property: they can enslave, torture, rape, and kill, with no consequences. Justice is never served in Lebanon for domestic workers.”

Omotola said she has several cases and several stories of migrant domestic workers who have been killed, maimed or raped and forced to commit suicide.”

She went on to advocate the abolition of the oppressive system.

“There are other systems like the one in the UAE that honours the migrant worker and makes sure that the promises are kept by both parties. When our government sign bilateral labour agreement, we counsel that they please read the provisions of that agreement before signing them so they don’t sign away our women and sisters into slavery by executive orders.”

COVID-19 compounds migrants’ plight

The outbreak of the coronavirus pandemic is said to have aggravated the plight of the migrants. According to Nia Evans of This is Lebanon, “before the pandemic, Lebanon’s general security stated that two women die each week due to these conditions, often from suicide or failed escapes. Now, under restrictions designed to slow the spread of COVID-19, entrapment, increased workplace abuse and non-payment of salary increase the likelihood of self-harm, suicide and death.”

Nia added that COVID-19 is spreading like wild fire in Lebanon and “MDW are the most vulnerable in this society and are therefore more prone to being infected by the virus. MDW have no access to health care or social support. They are stigmatised, abused and subjected to racism on a daily basis.

“They are at risk of homelessness and being detained and placed in already overcrowded detention facilities. Those stranded are vulnerable to exploitation, including sex trafficking or being sold to other employers.”

On her part, Omotola said because of the Covid-19 pandemic and the downturn in the economy, a lot of migrant workers were pushed out on the street and left to fend for themselves because they could no longer be catered for.

“They were stranded in a country they couldn’t leave and they didn’t have enough money. Some of them have had to turn to prostitution just to survive.

“While I don’t support prostitution, I find it very sickening that women would have to turn to it to survive because there seems to be no other way to live.

READ  Covid-19: IOM supports health actors, builds  90 quarantine shelters in Nigeria
lebanon arrival
•Some of the ladies on arrival from Lebanon

“Our sisters do not have to live like this.  Our sisters, our mothers, our wives and citizens of Nigeria should not be involved in this.  We need to put an end to this. The government needs to be a lot more responsible and responsive.

“The government needs to understand that when a citizen approaches her government in a foreign country, her government should not collude with her slave masters to keep her impoverished.

“I say this with all sense of responsibility. I say this with all sense of modesty. Our sisters are suffering; period. They are not just in a space of impoverishment and their back being doubly bent, they have also lost their self esteem; they have lost their sense of personhood.

“A lot of them are deeply trumatised, and even if they return home, they cannot raise their heads high because they have been battered.  As a collective, as a nation, and as a body of people, we can do better.”

How African leaders can checkmate Lebanon

Worried by the despicable experiences of Africans in the Middle East, Nia called on African leaders to stop the menace. “Many of these African governments do have the power to stand up and fight for their workers. Unfortunately, only few of them are taking the steps necessary.

“On the most basic level, they can be providing evacuation flights, quarantine measures and ensuring that they have a Consul in Lebanon who cares for each of their nationals, more than the shady business deals done through the consulate.

“These governments could take a coordinated action that would almost immediately get all migrant domestic workers in Lebanon home who would like to leave.

“The African governments could solve this problem overnight. Lebanon is in a currency crisis, and one of the largest sources of income in Lebanon is money sent from Lebanese nationals who own businesses in Lebanon.

“These countries could unite and say that they won’t allow money to be sent to Lebanon until Lebanon returns their women. The African sending countries have the upper-hand, but they have to choose to use it.”

Quoting the Lebanese Embassy in Nigeria, Nia said there are approximately 5,000 Nigerians living in Lebanon.

“Many of these Nigerians are MDW, identified as females and being made destitutes. They have been forced into domestic servitude. They have been mistreated physically, sexually and mentally by their employers and agents.

“As a collective, This is Lebanon and Syrian Eyes have been assisting the Nigerian community of MDWs since August 2020. So far, in the safe houses we have supported approximately 150 Nigerian women with zero assistance from Nigerian authorities.

“At present, we are supporting approximately 51 women who have escaped from abusive agents/employers, women who have been dumped in front of the embassy and women who have been forced into homelessness.

“With very limited resources we have been attempting to meet the women’s most basic needs by providing food, covering rents, purchasing flights and covering the cost of PCR tests.”

Lebanon stops issuance of visas to domestic workers from Nigeria

The Lebanese Government early in June this year announced that it had suspended issuance of working visas to Nigerians seeking to work in Lebanon, particularly for domestic work.

Lebanese Ambassador to Nigeria, Ambassador Houssam Diab, stated that the suspension started since May 1 as a result of complaints of abuse by some employers as well as the case of the video of Peace Busari, a Nigerian lady auctioned for sale for $1000 on social media in April this year, which went viral.

According to Diab, the suspension was to stem the tide for such categories of workers pending the time the procedure would be properly harmonised with the Ministry of Labour, in line with best practices of managed and orderly migration.

 

Culled from The Nation Newspaper

 

 

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Investigation

Human traffickers in brutal exploits (2)


  • How pastor masterminded my prostitution journey to Russia —Victim

Says I paid my madam $45,000, her mother requested additional $1,000


In spite of the measures put in place by various governments to check the activities of human traffickers, the syndicates have continued to laugh all the way to the bank, leaving their victims to lick their own wounds. The International Labour Organisation (ILO) estimates that human trafficking generates $150.2 billion in illegal profits each year at the expense of innocent people’s lives. Many of the victims have returned home worse off financially and health wise than they were before travelling abroad purportedly for greener pastures, INNOCENT DURU reports.

WHO are human traffickers and where can they be found? These are fundamental questions that hardly cross the minds of most victims of human trafficking as they innocently give themselves up to people they could wager would do them no harm.
The experience of Florence, an indigene of Edo State, reveals that traffickers could be anybody and could be found anywhere, including worship centres.The young lady had completed her apprenticeship in hairdressing and started life with the skill she had acquired without any plan of travelling abroad to seek greener pastures. But the story changed when a trusted pastor in her church convinced her that she could be better off if she travelled abroad to practice the craft.

Since questioning the views of a clergy man is seen as a taboo  in this part of the world, the dark complexioned lady accepted everything that the man of God told her hook, line and sinker, believing in the prophecy that her breakthrough and time to shine had come. She eventually travelled abroad with high hopes. But instead of a breakthrough, the journey became a huge setback for her life.

She said: “I was trafficked to Russia in 2017. They told me I was going to practice my handwork there, but it was not what they told me that I found on getting there. I started selling my body to men.

“Ironically, the man in charge of the journey was an assistant pastor in my church. He was the one who told me that I would be better off over there and would be better positioned to take care of myself and my family.

“But the story changed when I got to Russia. My madam, who was my pastor’s sister, told

Abike Dabiri Erewa

me to put my craft aside because the way I would pay her back was different from what they had told me. She said I would have to work as a prostitute to pay her back because that was the easiest way to get the money.”

Caught between the devil and the deep blue sea, Florence said she immediately realised that she had no choice in the matter, given the stern manner the woman spoke.

“She was speaking with threats. And since I had nobody to run to over there, I decided to do her wish. I paid a total of $45, 000 to my madam, even though I don’t know how much they spent for my travelling. The only thing they asked me to do was to obtain my passport, which I borrowed money to do. After the payment, things got bad. Her mother started asking for her own percentage.

 

“Before I left Nigeria, she had taken my finger nails, pant and hair from my pubic areas. I didn’t want to give it to her, but the pastor said I would have to do it because that was the only way I could gain the mother’s trust. I succumbed and gave all those things to her.”

Still living with the scars the heinous crime has left in her life, Florence added: “After paying her daughter’s money, she madam’s mother) said I would have to give her $1,000 before she would return the things she collected from me. She threatened that if I didn’t pay her, something terrible would happen to me.

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“I subsequently called my mum and told her everything. I later raised about N20, 000 and sent it to the pastor to give to her mother. After receiving it, she called and asked why I had to send her that kind of money. She said I should know that she is a family woman and that I should have sent the money in dollars. She then said I should send more money within a week or face the consequences.

 

“After that call, I started having series of issues and a problem with my face. I thought it was something I could easily handle but it defied all treatments. They drove me out of the place where I was working and also sent me parking from my apartment in Moscow.

“It was at that point I told my mum exactly what I was doing there. She started crying and asked why I didn’t tell her about it all along. I could not tell her because I had no telephone and was only permitted to speak for a minute on my madam’s phone.”

Asked how she eventually overcame the problem with her face, Florence said: “It was when I returned to Nigeria that my face became okay. I sincerely don’t know how.

“The pastor denied me when they arrested him. He said he could only remember that I was an ordinary member in the church. Later, he turned round and said I was the one who came to tell him I wanted to travel out because I was frustrated.

“He was charged to court by NAPTIP, which took me to their shelter when I returned. I didn’t know when they granted the pastor bail. They wrote an undertaking that if anything happened to me, he would be held responsible.”

Naomi, another indigene of Edo State, told of how she met the man who trafficked her at the most unlikely place in the state.

She said: “I was trafficked to Russia by a man who I met at Ogida Barracks here in Edo State. He asked me if I was interested in travelling abroad and I said yes, but he never told me what I was going there to do.

“They used student documents to process my trip. They gave the impression that I was going there to study. When I got there, I was asked to do something that was entirely different. I had no choice but to do it because I was already there. I stayed in Russia for over four years and paid my madam a total of $40, 000. I resided in St Petersburg.”

Describing her stay in Russia as unpleasant, Naomi added: “My madam was very mean. She denied me every form of freedom you can think about. I didn’t have freedom to buy a phone to call my family or the freedom to send money to them. She maltreated me and sometimes beat me up. She said there was no way I would go back without fully paying her and that I was free to go back or remain there after the payments.

“There was a day she beat me to the extent that blood was dripping from my nose and I could not breathe. I was down for more than an hour and she did not bother to take me to the hospital. It was a neighbour that helped me out.

“I took an oath before travelling. I vowed not to blackmail my madam and to pay her, her complete money.

“Only two of us embarked on the journey. But on getting to Russia, I saw a lot of Nigerians. When I say a lot, I mean a lot.  I was paid 2, 500 Robos for an hour. The owner of the place where we worked would take 1,250 Robos, they will collect 500 Robos for security and leave us with the balance. My madam didn’t allow me to save a dime. She had her eyes fixed on me always.”

READ  Human traffickers in brutal exploits (2)

Naomi recalled that she returned to Nigeria alongside Florence after wasting four odd years of her life in Russia. But despite her predicament, she said, her family was neither angry nor aggressive towards when she returned. “They were even happy that I came back alive,” she said.

“I couldn’t stay back after paying my madam, because I was frustrated. Things were not moving for me.  It was like somebody introducing you to something and backed you up with some diabolical powers to make you succeed and pay the money you agreed to pay. After the contract, the success will fade off and you will be on your own.

“After completing the payment, I became ill. I was having cold and blood shortage. When I went to the hospital, a doctor advised me to return to Nigeria because it appeared the weather was very bad for my health.

“Human traffickers are terrible and horrible people. It is not something a young lady should experience.

Alaba, another victim, who was working as a nurse before travelling to Lebanon, said she was trafficked by someone who used to be her patient.

The young lady, who is stranded in the Middle East country, said in a chat with our correspondent: “The woman who trafficked me was someone I normally treated, being a nurse. I told her I wished I could have a shop to start my own business. She told me that I should try and go to Lebanon just to take care of the house of my boss.

“Unfortunately, I found myself in slavery here. I have not been paid salary for some months now, yet the agent (trafficker) kept pestering me to send money to her. I need help to leave this place and return home.”

How traffickers hounded me out of Nigeria – Ex IYAMIDR informant

After reading the first part of this report published last Saturday, an informant, whose whereabouts were said to be unknown, called from his base abroad to share his experience.

The former informant for Initiative for Youth Awareness on Migration, Immigration, Development and Reintegration (IYAMIDR), who identified himself simply as Wisdom, said: “While I was working for IYAMIDR, there was some information I was giving them about traffickers’ activities.

“There was particular information I gave the organisation not knowing that another person I had informed about the issue was one of the traffickers. When I passed the information to the President of IYAMIDR, Comrade Solomon Okoduwa, he swung into action immediately and got the suspects arrested.  But before I knew it, I started receiving threat messages.

“In one of the messages, I was told to run away from the state (Edo) if I loved my life. One day, as I was returning from a journey, some guys came and started harassing me. They said, ‘You are showing off. You think we don’t know what you do? Your cup will soon be full. Don’t worry; very, very soon, all these things you are doing, you will not do them again here but in another planet.

“When the threats and other scary signs that I was seeing were becoming too much, I ran to Lagos. Before I travelled, some security operatives who I also trusted with information betrayed me. They were revealing my activities to some arrested traffickers, telling them I was the guy that masterminded their arrest.

“When I got all those information, I felt there was nobody to be trusted, so I made up my mind to leave Edo State.”

Did fleeing to Lagos State provide the needed solution to his problem?

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Wisdom said no, adding: “After about two weeks in my sister’s place in Lagos, my in-law told me that I was not safe in Lagos too because they were looking for me. He said it was like I did something that was making them to be all out to hurt me. I said not really and went on to explain what happened. He said they were really bent on getting me and that it would be better for me to leave the country.

“Mafias and cultists are everywhere in the country. If they are out to get somebody, there is nowhere the person will go that they will not trace him.

“I had to raise money to leave the country. I left for Italy, but on getting there, I realised that Italy is an advanced extension of Nigeria. Everything that is happening in Nigeria is equally happening in Italy.  Running to Italy was as good as still remaining in Nigeria.

“The information I also got in Italy was that the policemen there have information about the activities of Nigerians in Italy at the back of their hands. If you report to them that blacks are fighting, they will do as if you know where they are from. And once you say Nigeria, they will ask you to leave them.

“It is only when there is bloodshed or someone is killed that the police will show up, because they are already used to Nigerians lifestyle of gangsterism. The police there in Italy will tell you they are tired of Nigerians. When I got that information, I felt Italy would not be a safe place for me to stay.

“Before I started working as an informant, I was always quick to dismiss the claims by my friends that they were attacked by strange guys for daring to expose their activities. It was when I found myself in that situation that I knew my friends were not making frivolous claims.”

‘Working with survivors of human trafficking revealing and disturbing’

Tayo Elegbede, Media Lead of The Migrant Project, a non-governmental organisation providing support for migrants, says their experience working with survivors of human trafficking has been “quite revealing and perhaps disturbing at some point.”

2019 International Migrants Day

Media Lead, The Migrant ProjectTayo Elegbede

Through their counseling and psychological support sessions, he said, “we realised that most survivors are often overwhelmed and traumatised by their experiences. They are unsure of the future, family acceptance and public outlook, hence, they feel lonely and unwanted in the society.

“This understanding helps us to engage their mental and behavioural state, which is usually the starting point to help them relax and gain their trust to go through the needed therapy.

“At this point, empathy is reflected as against sympathy, to help them start the journey through psychological rewiring.

“Aside the psychological framework of the support, we realise their experiences often impact their health and physical wellbeing. Therefore, medical and humanitarian support is provided to salvage their conditions.”





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