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Experts speak on importance of accurate data on migration to implement GCM

Global migration experts have suggested that countries should ensure having adequate and accurate data of outgoing and returning migrant workers to take effective interventions at the national levels to protect the migrants during this COVID-19 pandemic situation.
Speaking at the first session of the Global Compact for Migration (GCM) webinar series held on Tuesday (September 1), they underscored the need for collecting and utilizing disaggregated migration data to promote safe, orderly and regular migration.
The webinar series happened under part of the six months Certificate Programme on “Global Compact for Safe Orderly and Regular Migration (GCM)” hosted by Migrant Forum in Asia (MFA), Cross Regional Center for Refugees and Migrants (CCRM), Global Research Forum on Diaspora and Transnationalism (GRFDT), and the Civil Society Action Committee (CSAC).
MFA regional coordinator William Gois who moderated the sessions threw the volley of questions before the expert panelists to highlight what kind of data actually needed for the countries as these data helped them shaping the migration policies.
He said that the respective countries themselves should determine what kind of data especially on remittance and migration, returning migrants they need for collection to take measures including the reintegration of the COVID affected returnees.
William said that although collecting and utilizing accurate and disaggregated data becomes ‘the first objective of the GCM but it is not the easy objective to work with.’
About 500 participants joined the webinar discussed that the UN member states agreed on the goals of the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration (GCM) for managing international migration in all dimensions.
The non-binding GCM encompassed a total of 23 objectives for better managing migration at local, national, regional and global levels.
The Objective 1 of the GCM begins with a commitment to collect and utilize accurate and disaggregated data as a basis for evidence-based policies.
Speaking a panelist, Bela Hovy, Chief of Publications, Outreach and Support Unit in UN DESA highlighted the importance of migration data for implementation of the global compact for migration.
“Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration is extremely practical. We don’t need further guidance. In fact, let us make it work. There are lots of low-hanging fruits but quite few actions can be easily implemented. We cannot progress on data in our daily works step by step bottom up,” Bela said.
A presentation was made on background history of the GCM, an intergovernmentally negotiated agreement, prepared under the auspices of the United Nations that covered all dimensions of international migration in a holistic and comprehensive manner.
It was formally endorsed by the United Nations General Assembly on 19 December 2018.
In his concluding remarks, Bela Hovy stressed the need for collecting accurate and disaggregated data on migration to simultaneously implement the 2030 agenda and the GCM in all spheres.
Echoing the importance of migration data, Sonia Plaza, Senior Economist in the Finance, Competitiveness and Innovation Global Practice of the World Bank, mentioned that Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) included the issues of migrant workers who were affected by the COVID-19 among other stakeholders.
She said that the impact of COVID has been detrimental disturbing the flows of the migrants and remittances of the different countries. Besides, migration became affected as many countries were in wars and others have been facing economic recessions, she said.
Sonia Plaza emphasized on collaboration of the civil society organizations, international bodies and relevant stakeholders to collect data of the migration as “policies can be based on data on remittances and migrant workers.”
“We have the GCM to improve the international comparability and comfortability of data on migration,” said Sonia Plaza.
Dr S. Irudaya Rajan, Professor, Ministry of Overseas Indian Affairs (MOIA) Research Unit on International Migration at the Centre for Development Studies, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, also spoke as panelist at the webinar.
Raising the context of Indian migrant workers and Non- Resident Indians, Prof Rajan said that there was no specific data of the Indian migrants badly impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic.
The lockdown imposed by their government to control spread of coronavirus fully stopped mobility of migrant workers in India, he noted that data was very important to manage COVID but nobody knew how many Indian migrants got stranded abroad and how many of them returned home.
Migration specialist Sara Salman, who is representing the UN Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia said that accessible data had been the preconditions to achieving the rest 22 objectives of GCM.
She said that if there were no reliable data on migration, it would not be possible to see the migration from 360-degree vision.
Migration Governance analyst of Zambia Paddy Siyanga Knudsen, Bangladesh’s former foreign secretary Shahidul Haque and Shabari Nair, of Labour Migration Specialist for South Asia, based in the ILO Decent Work Technical Support Team (DWT) in New Delhi, among others also spoke at the webinar.

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Response capacities stretched with hasty return of 40,000 Ethiopian migrants

International Organisation of Migration (

Ethiopia – The International Organization for Migration (IOM) is urgently appealing for funds to respond to the needs of 40,000 Ethiopian migrants returning from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). Over 30,000 have arrived in Ethiopia over the last two weeks, at the rate of over 2,600 people a day. More than 20,400 (68 per cent) are from parts of Tigray and Amhara regions which are in the midst of conflict in Northern Ethiopia that has displaced nearly two million people.

The returns of Ethiopian migrants follow a bilateral agreement between the governments of Ethiopia and KSA.

According to IOM, USD 740,000 is needed to provide assistance for every 10,000 migrants returning. This is for essentials such as medical treatment, supplies for babies and infants such as diapers, clothing, help with finding and tracing family members, and reunifying them or providing alternative care arrangements as appropriate, as well as to respond to protection concerns.

“This sudden upsurge in returns poses a major challenge to our ability to assist the returnees – many of whom require medical and psychosocial assistance, support reuniting with their families, and livelihood options that would help to diminish the appeal of irregular re-migration to KSA and other countries of destination,” says Maureen Achieng, IOM Chief of Mission in Ethiopia.

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“Our response is seriously underfunded and barely reaching the needs of returnees in the provision of essential basic and specialized assistance, including for unaccompanied migrant children, pregnant and lactating mothers, and victims of trafficking.”

Many of the migrants will require help to return and reintegrate back into their communities.  Reintegration assistance is therefore vital to supporting the returnees psychologically, and to find work and stability, to help them avoid irregular migration, and exploitation by trafficking and smuggling rings.

The returning migrants are among the target population included in the Regional Migrant Response Plan  2021-2024 (MRP) for the Horn of Africa and Yemen, a USD 99 million appeal launched by IOM and 39 partners in March 2021 to address the protection needs, risks and vulnerabilities of migrants along this route. The MRP is underfunded and urgently requires additional resources to carry out its response, including for this target population.

While recognizing the sovereign right of States to determine their national migration policy and their prerogative to govern migration within their jurisdiction, in conformity with international law, IOM, as part of the United Nations Network on Migration, reaffirms its commitment to keeping everyone safe. It means that all Member States need to ensure that collective expulsions of migrants and asylum-seekers must be halted; that protection needs, including international protection, must be individually assessed; and that the rule of law and due process must be observed. It also means prioritizing protection, including every child’s best interest, under the obligations in international law.

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IOM provides over 1,300 migrants with emergency shelter and assistance on the Canary Islands

International Organisation of Migration (

Madrid – As more migrants arrive in the Canary Islands, the International Organization for Migration (IOM) has provided shelter, protection services, medical, legal and other types of assistance to 1,361 migrants on Tenerife.

The arrival of more than 23,000 people in the Canary Islands by sea in 2020, particularly in the last three months of the year, strained the reception capacity and COVID-19 has further complicated the response.  In November 2020, the Government of Spain announced “Plan Canarias” to renovate and expand the archipelago’s reception facilities to accommodate and assist 7,000 migrants.

Since 26 February this year, IOM has been operating at the Las Canteras Emergency Reception Facility (ERF) on Tenerife to support the Spanish government in managing the site. The EU-funded facility is an open centre which can accommodate as many as 1,100 people.

“Our priority is to support Spain with site management to provide safe and dignified living conditions and tailored services for migrants who have arrived via extremely treacherous journeys to the Canary Islands,” said Maria Jesús Herrera, Head of IOM’s Office in Spain.

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Today, some 300 migrants are staying at the facility from Morocco, Senegal, Mali, Guinea Conakry, Guinea Bissau, Sudan, The Gambia, Mauritania and Côte d’Ivoire.

At Las Canteras, IOM provides meals, core relief items, water and sanitation, maintenance, and Multipurpose Cash Assistance. The Organization also offers protection assistance, which includes vulnerability assessments, Mental Health and Psychosocial Support (MHPSS), primary health care, legal information and counselling for family reunification or international protection, and assistance with transfers of eligible vulnerable migrants to the mainland.

IOM’s Assisted Voluntary Return and Reintegration (AVRR) is also available to migrants who wish to return to their country of origin.

Marouane, a 27-year-old from Morocco, had arrived at the facility on 6 March. One year ago, he risked a harrowing sea journey towards the islands.

“For three days, you hang out with death, you see it. But if you don’t die, then you get there,” he told IOM in May.

To date, IOM has provided legal counselling to more than 780 people seeking asylum, in cooperation with UNHCR, the UN’s refugee agency. IOM also ensured – through close collaboration with the Spanish authorities – the referral and transfer of some 682 migrants to other specialized centres on the islands and the mainland.

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The Organization also works closely with the municipality of La Laguna to engage with neighbourhood associations, the Tenerife council, civil society, citizens and local actors in the interest of transparency, mutual exchange, and social cohesion.

“We consider the people hosted in Las Canteras centre as citizens of La Laguna municipality. We therefore try to collaborate as much as possible so that they also benefit from the activities organized by the City Council,” said José Luis Hernandez, Environment Councillor from the La Laguna City Hall.

Arrivals to the Canary Islands on the Western Africa-Atlantic Route this year have reached 7,309 – more than double the number of arrivals at the same time last year. Some 23,848 migrants have reached Spain irregularly via all land and sea routes so far this year.

The project at Las Canteras,“Supporting the Spanish Authorities in managing an Emergency Reception Facility on the Canary Islands”, is funded by the EU (European Commission, DG Home). The overall management of the ERF is under the coordination of the Site Manager of the Spanish Ministry of Inclusion, Social Security and Migration. 

 

READ  In the 21st century, we are all migrants
  • IOM staff welcome a group of newly arrived migrants at the Las Canteras facility on Tenerife, Spain. Photo: IOM

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IOM Ethiopia appeals for USD 40 million to assist additional 1.6 million people in Northern Ethiopia

Addis Ababa – Nearly two million people affected by the crisis in northern Ethiopia desperately need life-saving assistance, including water, medicine and shelter, the International Organization for Migration (IOM) said today as it issued an urgent appeal for USD 40 million to help internally displaced men, women and children, including newborn babies.

Since the outbreak of the conflict eight months ago in Ethiopia’s Tigray Regional State, millions of people are enduring unimaginable suffering, including forced displacement, hunger, death, and destruction of private and public property.

In Tigray, IOM has been providing support to more than half a million people, including displaced children, women, men, and vulnerable groups such as pregnant women and persons with disabilities. This includes shelter and provision of essential items such as food, water, clothing, medicine and supplies for babies, as well as sanitation and hygiene services.

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IOM has also been supporting camp coordination and management efforts, providing mental health care to those in need, and producing Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) reports to shed light on the evolving situation.

Nearly USD 70 million (USD 69.3M) is needed to respond to the needs of internally displaced populations in northern Ethiopia but only USD 28.7 million has been received this year. IOM needs an extra USD 40.6 million for the remainder of 2021 to be able to continue and further expand its response to help the displaced.

“The nearly two million people displaced by this crisis continue to live in inhumane and undignified conditions and require critical and urgent support,” said Maureen Achieng, IOM Chief of Mission to Ethiopia and Representative to the African Union and UNECA. “IOM Director General António Vitorino said it before, and we say it again: we must act without delay to meet the needs of people in the region.”

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The situation in Tigray remains volatile. In partnership and coordination with other UN agencies, IOM is committed to delivering life-saving humanitarian assistance, to continue reaching people in need. IOM is planning to significantly scale up response programming and increase the deployment of senior IOM staff in the region despite the severe shortage of funding.

IOM’s response is aligned with the Inter-Cluster Coordination Group’s (ICCG) – a cooperative effort among sectors and the Humanitarian Country Team to improve the national response – Northern Ethiopia Response Plan, which estimates that 5.2 million people are in dire need in the worst-case scenario of this escalating humanitarian crisis.

 

IOM’s Global Crisis Response Platform provides an overview of IOM’s plans and funding requirements to respond to the evolving needs and aspirations of those impacted by, or at risk of, crisis and displacement in 2021 and beyond. The Platform is regularly updated as crises evolve and new situations emerge.

READ  38 people including children feared dead as vessel carrying fleeing civilians sinks 

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